Skip to content

Are Electric Scooters Legal in the UK?

Electric scooters have become an increasingly popular mode of transportation in the UK. However, many people are unsure about their legal status. The question of whether electric scooters are legal in the UK is a complex one, with many factors to consider.

Currently, electric scooters are legal to own in the UK, but their use is heavily restricted. They can only be used on private land with the landowner’s permission. Riding an electric scooter on public roads, pavements, or cycle lanes is illegal and can result in a fine and penalty points on your driving licence. However, this may change in the future as the government is running trials of electric scooters in certain areas of the country.

It’s important for anyone considering purchasing or using an electric scooter to understand the current laws and regulations surrounding their use. This article will provide an overview of the current legal status of electric scooters in the UK, as well as any upcoming changes that may affect their use.

Legality of Electric Scooters in the UK

Electric scooters have become increasingly popular in recent years as a convenient and eco-friendly mode of transportation. However, the legality of electric scooters in the UK can be confusing for many people.

As of January 2024, it is currently illegal to use a privately owned electric scooter on public roads, pavements, or cycle lanes in the UK. Electric scooters can only be legally used on private land with the permission of the landowner. However, it is legal to buy, sell and own an electric scooter.

The UK government has announced plans to expand the legal use of electric scooters in the near future. In the meantime, there are many restrictions surrounding where electric scooters can be used. Currently, electric scooters can only be used on private land with the landowner’s permission.

Riders of electric scooters who use them on public roads or pavements risk being fined and having penalty points added to their driving licence. Additionally, riders who do not have the correct licence or insurance could face a Fixed Penalty Notice with a £300 fine and six penalty points on their licence.

It is important for riders to be aware of the current laws and restrictions surrounding the use of electric scooters in the UK. As the laws and regulations surrounding electric scooters are subject to change, it is recommended that riders stay up to date with the latest developments.

UK Electric Scooter Laws and Regulations

Public Road Use

As of January 2024, it is not yet legal to ride privately owned electric scooters on public roads in the UK. However, the government has launched a number of e-scooter trials across the country, allowing riders to use rented e-scooters on public roads in designated areas. These trials are aimed at assessing the safety and viability of e-scooters as a mode of transport, with a view to potentially legalizing their use on public roads in the future.

It is worth noting that the use of e-scooters on public roads without permission is currently illegal and can result in a fine, penalty points on your driving licence, or even seizure of the e-scooter.

Private Land Use

Electric scooters can be used on private land with the landowner’s permission. This includes private roads, driveways, and gardens. However, it is important to note that the landowner has the right to revoke permission at any time, and that e-scooters should not be used in a way that causes a nuisance or disturbance to others.

In addition, there are certain restrictions on the use of e-scooters on private land. For example, e-scooters should not be used in a way that endangers the safety of the rider or others, and they should not be used in areas where they are likely to cause damage to property.

Requirements for Riding Electric Scooters

Age Restrictions

To ride an electric scooter in the UK, the rider must meet the minimum age limit set by the provider. The age limit can vary depending on the rental company, so it’s important to check with them beforehand. Generally, the minimum age limit is 16 years old.

Insurance and Tax

Currently, electric scooters are not required to have insurance or pay road tax in the UK. However, riders are still encouraged to take out personal liability insurance to protect themselves in case of an accident.

Safety Equipment

It is highly recommended that riders wear a helmet when riding an electric scooter. This is not only for their own safety but also to comply with the Highway Code. In addition to a helmet, riders should also wear appropriate clothing and footwear. It is also recommended to use lights and reflectors to increase visibility, especially when riding at night.

According to the Road Traffic Act 1988, electric scooters must meet the same standards as motor vehicles to be road legal. This means that the scooter must be roadworthy and registered with the DVLA. Currently, electric scooters can only be used on private land with the permission of the landowner. Riding an electric scooter on public roads, pavements, or cycle lanes is illegal unless authorized as part of a government trial.

Penalties for Illegal Use of Electric Scooters

Electric scooters are currently classified as “powered transporters” by the UK government, and their use is subject to specific laws and regulations. It is illegal to use them on pavements, in cycle lanes, and in pedestrian-only areas. It would only be legal to use them on public roads if they could meet certain requirements.

If someone is caught using an electric scooter illegally, they could face penalties and fines. The following are some of the possible penalties for illegal use of electric scooters:

  • On-the-spot fines: If caught riding an electric scooter on a public road, a person could face an on-the-spot fine of up to £300. This fine could be issued by a police officer or a council officer.
  • Penalty points: If a person is caught riding an electric scooter on a public road without a valid driving licence or insurance, they could receive penalty points on their driving licence. This could affect their ability to drive other vehicles in the future.
  • Confiscation: If a person is caught riding an electric scooter illegally, the police or council officers may confiscate the scooter. The owner would then have to pay a fee to get it back.

It is essential to note that the penalties for illegal use of electric scooters are enforced to ensure the safety of all road users. Electric scooters can be dangerous if not used correctly, and it is crucial to follow the rules and regulations set by the government.

Moreover, it is worth noting that the UK government is currently conducting trials of rental e-scooters in selected areas of the country. These rental e-scooters are subject to different regulations than privately owned e-scooters. Therefore, it is important to check the rules and regulations before using an electric scooter, whether privately owned or rented.

Future of Electric Scooter Legislation in the UK

The UK government has been working on legalizing electric scooters for use on public roads and cycle lanes. In May 2022, the government announced that new rules to expand legal use of e-scooters are a priority for the upcoming year. The government also said it would legislate to create a new body to regulate the use of e-scooters.

In the Queen’s Speech of May 2022, the government announced that the use of electric scooters on public roads is set to be made legal under a new Transport Bill. The bill is expected to be introduced in the Parliament in 2023. Once the bill is passed, privately owned e-scooters will be legalised for use on public roads and cycle lanes in the UK.

The new legislation will come with strict regulations. The government has already released a set of guidelines for e-scooter users. These guidelines include:

  • E-scooters must have a maximum speed of 15.5 mph.
  • E-scooters must not be ridden on pavements.
  • E-scooters must have a maximum weight of 55kg.
  • E-scooters must be fitted with a bell or horn.
  • E-scooters must have front and rear lights.

The government has also said that e-scooter riders will need to have a full or provisional driving license, and that they will need to be at least 16 years old. Riders will also need to wear a helmet.

Overall, the future of electric scooter legislation in the UK looks promising. The government is committed to legalizing e-scooters for use on public roads and cycle lanes, and is taking steps to ensure that the new legislation is safe and effective. Once the new Transport Bill is passed, e-scooter riders will be able to enjoy the benefits of this convenient and eco-friendly mode of transportation.